Developing contextual responses to the abuse and exploitation of young people

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Schools

Last updated: Tue 07, 2018

Schools are an important context in which young people spend time, socialise and make friends. We also know from speaking with young people that schools are locations where young people feel safe, but also come across harm. When schools are identified as places young people encounter violence and abuse, practitioners need support to identify and intervene. To date, interventions into peer-on-peer abuse in schools has predominately targeted individual young people or relied on sanctions and exclusions that target problematic behaviours. When harm is located within schools, practitioners need advice and resources to disrupt harmful social and cultural practices. A contextual approach to safeguarding in schools can consider how staff are supported with training and relevant policies and procedures, options for young people to identify and disclose harm and the relationship between schools and the local community.

The Contextual Safeguarding Network includes a range of tools, resources and videos for practitioners working in schools. These include a toolkit for assessing school responses to harmful sexual behaviour, videos on how contextual safeguarding applies to schools, resources for multi-agency partners to consider school exclusions and managed moves, and briefings for education providers.

Harmful sexual behaviour in schools assessment tool

This new tool supports schools to self-assess their response to harmful sexual behaviour. The toolkit includes a traffic-light table, self assessment scorecard and five webinars on how to carry out the assessment.

Other resources

This toolkit includes a range of tools for carrying out a school assessment including: videos, student and parent surveys, staff engagement and an assessment framework.

This case study exercise is a composite case study used to support international schools to think through putting contextual safeguarding theory into practice. Here we include background information, guidance for professionals and key resources for delivery.

Involving schools in the response to peer on peer abuse

In this Video Lia Latchford outlines the importance of involving schools in the response to peer on peer abuse and what this might look like in practice. 

This new tool supports multi-agency partnerships to self-assess their response to harmful sexual behaviour. The toolkit includes a traffic-light table and report on how to use the tool.

This new tool supports schools to self-assess their response to harmful sexual behaviour. The toolkit includes a traffic-light table, self assessment scorecard and five webinars on how to carry out the assessment.

Schools

Evidencing peer-on-peer abuse in educational settings

This learning project outlines how professionals capture, share and use information about peer-on-peer abuse that occurs within schools and alternative education settings. 

Schools

Working with schools and alternative education providers

Carlene Firmin with George Curtis, Danielle Fritz, Paul Olaitan, Lia Latchford, Jenny Lloyd and Ikamara Larasi

This extract from the report 'Towards a Contextual Response to Peer-on-Peer Abuse: Research and Resources from MsUnderstood local site work 2013-2016' highlights the role that education providers may play in responding to peer-on-peer abuse.  The extract discusses the potential for working with Fair Access Panels and opportunities for creating whole school approaches to respond to peer-on-peer abuse. If you would like a copy of the slides or editable copies of the resources within this extract, then Contact Us.

Schools

Peer-on-peer abuse toolkit for schools

Farrer & Co’s Safeguarding Unit, in collaboration with Dr Carlene Firmin

This document provides practical guidance for schools on how to prevent, identify early and respond appropriately to peer-on-peer abuse. It encourages schools to adopt a clear and comprehensive approach to such abuse - tailored to the school’s specific safeguarding circumstances, to look behind children’s behaviour, and to identify and challenge any underlying attitudes, social conditions and contextual dynamics that may have led to peer-on-peer abuse. The toolkit can be downloaded here.

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